Messy Church Does Science

'Explosions, speed, motion, beauty, wonder, colour, transformation, amazement… what’s not to like about science?'

 

BRF’s Messy Church has been embraced wholeheartedly by many local churches and through it we have the opportunity, as well as the creative imagination and energy, to bring science into the way we ‘do church’. We can help the subject become an accepted and expected part of worship and learning, and a means by which we can meet God and learn to love the natural world.

This year we received a grant from Scientists in Congregations, along with seven other science and faith projects, for a project entitled 'Messy Church Does Science'. 

Lucy Moore

Messy Churches are hot on discovery, experimentation and exploration; could we encourage even more Messy Church groups to feel confident about using science in the activity time, so that families would understand that the Church celebrates science and rejoices in it? We applied and happily were awarded the funding, so it’s all systems go!

Lucy Moore, Messy Church team

Messy Churches provide creative sessions for children and families to learn about the Christian faith. The grant will be used to develop materials to help Messy Church leaders use science to explore aspects of the Christian faith, and demonstrate that faith and science are complementary. The project aims to provide Messy Churches with 100 safe and simple scientific activities to try in church and to demonstrate that anyone can get involved in science. 

The Messy Church team will be working with various members of the wider Messy Church network, who have seen the opportunities for bringing faith and science together in a celebratory and Messy way. Dave Gregory aka. Dr Dave, a Baptist minister and meteorologist, is know for the Messy Science lab at his Messy Church and will be sharing his wisdom. 

 

Dr Dave and his Messy Science lab

Now, each month twenty children aged from five to ten, along with some parents, come along to the 'Messy Science Lab' led by Dr Dave in his white scientist coat. The experiments are simple, using kitchen equipment and everyday materials. Yet the wonder of childhood is that simple things evoke 'wow' moments. Activities like looking at the veins on a leaf through a toy microscope, or watching spinning diatoms in a drop of pond water. Or extracting DNA—even more exciting when it’s your parents or grandparents having to wash their mouth out with nasty salt water—yes, Messy Science can get messy! 

Dave Gregory 

Lights

Image acknowledgements

© D Gregory

How can you get involved?

science

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